3 Obvious Ways to Build Wealth

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You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to build wealth. The wealthy understand that while being smart can certainly help you earn money, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll build wealth with your earnings.

Likewise, being famous doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be able to build wealth. Sure, it can help, but there are countless stories of those who earn a ton of money only to watch it disappear seemingly overnight.

So, what are the secrets to building wealth? And, once you build wealth, how do you keep it? The truth is that the “secrets” to building wealth really aren’t secrets at all.

They are simply common sense behaviors that, when practiced with purpose and over a long period of time, are likely to result in a pool full of cash. Let’s take a look at some of these behaviors.

1. Say “no” to debt.

Saying “no” to debt is truly a behavior at the heart of so many wealthy individuals. Why? It has something to do with interest rates.

Student loans, credit cards, personal loans, car loans, and many other types of debt all have interest rates. Some of these rates are higher than others, but one thing is guaranteed: you will pay a lot more money than necessary if you make minimum payments on a loan, and the interest rates will slowly drain any wealth you do have.

Unfortunately, that’s where many people get stuck. They are so used to debt, they think it’s normal and shrug it off as a way of life. Sure, it might be a way of life for some people, but it doesn’t have to be a way of life for you.

The way to get out of debt is to focus your energy on saying “no” to more debt. Make money fast, you might choose to attack your debt even faster than you might initially think possible.

2. Practice discipline and invest for the long-term.

It can be all too easy to get caught up in the hype of this stock or that stock. The media continually reports this or that “new hot stock.” Don’t fall for the trap. It is always better to diversify your investments and not get carried away by the allure of quick wealth.

The number one behavior that inevitably leads to more wealth is staying disciplined. Emotions are very real and very dangerous, and it’s hard to be objective about your money, especially when people around us are talking about doom and gloom as it relates to the economy. Most of your money is invested for the long-term – do not make short-term decisions about your long-term money.

The best way to get market-like returns is not to meddle with your investment mix. If you do, the probability of achieving your financial goals will most likely go down. Predicting where the stock market is headed and making decisions off the prediction is a fool’s game. It requires a crystal ball – and no one has a crystal ball. Stay disciplined.

3. Stay frugal.

It’s human nature for any increase in income to be immediately swallowed by lifestyle improvements, a phenomenon known as ‘lifestyle creep’. Avoid lifestyle creep and build guaranteed increases into your savings plan by changing the way you think about annual raises. The next time you are presented with a raise, challenge yourself to save half of the increase, and ‘creep’ with the other half. This strategy will allow you to pay yourself first, enjoy the fruits of your labor, and build wealth over time.

It’s better to stay frugal, build wealth, and have a firm financial position rather than squander your money on things that you really don’t need – especially over the long-term.

4 Smart Steps to Financial Freedom

Financial freedom is defined as the state of not having to work actively and be able to sustain a desirable lifestyle. You will have the ability to make choices, to spend time with your family and loved ones, to travel the world or to pursue a lifelong interest which you haven’t been able to. All these can be done without worrying about money. Read on to find out what are some steps which you can take in your pursuit of financial freedom.

1. Create a budget

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If you are earning an average annual income of $50,000, in 35 working years you will earn a total of $1.75 million in today’s dollars. If inflation averages 3%, this becomes $3 million. But how much are you likely to save? Some people may say, “If I earn more in future than what I get now, I will be fine.” But in reality, this is easier said than done.

Whether we earn $2,000 per month or $20,000 per month, we ALL have a problem with saving money. The more we earn, the more we tend to spend. People who have worked for at least a few years can testify to that. Some fresh graduates earn about $3,000 per month. Three years into the workforce, some of them draw as much as $5,000 to $6,000 per month. Guess what? They feel poorer than they first started out. This is naturally so when you have multiple credit card bills, a car loan to service, a family to support, gym membership fees and many other expenses.

Therefore, it is wise to do a monthly cash flow budget, so that you know where your money goes. It is perhaps the first step to finding the extra dollars for saving and investment.

2. Protect your family and yourself

Our government consistently sets aside 20% of national budget on defence. Without a doubt, protection is of utmost importance. Isn’t it only appropriate that we allocate 5% to 10% of our income to defend against untoward circumstances?

Once you have set aside an emergency fund of 3 to 6 months of your living expenses, you should get down to taking care of your protection needs. This essentially means insuring You, because You are your greatest asset. We should be buying as little insurance as you need. But for most people, these protection needs are quite a lot.

3. Live well below your means

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Being frugal is the fundamental of wealth building. Yet, too often, we have the false impression that all millionaires lead an extravagant lifestyle, which is exactly opposite from the truth! People whom I talk to who are financially carefree are usually living well below their income. They still pamper themselves with the occasional indulgence and frequent holidays. But trust me, these people do their sums.

You should always discuss with your spouse on both your spending habits and hopefully arrive at a consensus. A couple cannot accumulate wealth if one of them is a spendthrift. Few can sustain lavish habits and simultaneously build wealth. Singaporeans generally build wealth by keeping a tight budget and controlling their expenses.

Remember, “The lower your lifestyle, the greater your true wealth”. How so? Say A earns $50,000 a year, spends $20,000 in a year and has $200,000 in saving. B earns $300,000 a year and spends $250,000 in a year and has $1.5m in saving. A is wealthier than B because if both of them lose their income, A can survive for 10 years based on his saving of $200,000 whereas B can only live for 6 years. Wealth is the duration your savings can last based on the lifestyle you are used to if you stop work now.

4. Don’t plan to save cash

Look at your monthly budget. You should have $600 left over every month and save $7,200 a year but where is the money? From my experience, Singaporean can’t save cash, or they simply save only to spend it all later. These folks faithfully put aside $600 every month, only to wipe it all off with a long December holiday. Some prefer to splurge on furniture and electronic gadgets, others on cars and home renovations. The money disappears naturally.

A typical Singaporean worker’s mindset is “I work so hard so I need to spend money to pamper myself.” Notice the logic, work hard and spend hard, work harder and spend harder. The only solution to this vicious cycle is to ensure that you have some form of disciplined and regular savings to help you set aside a certain percentage of your income every month.

Some practical tips are listed below:

  • Get yourself started in a profit participating insurance policy, variable life policy or “Buy Term and Invest the Difference”. Just get started on “something” and see it through!
  • Be persistent in setting aside at least 10-15% of your income every month; never waiver in this.
  • Immediately invest or allocate any unexpected windfall you receive, like a bigger than usual bonus. Chuck it away before you spend it away.