The 7 Deadly Sins of Investing

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There are a few investing errors that many people make — mistakes that are detrimental to their overall investment strategies. Here are the Deadly Sins of Investing that you should avoid…

  1. Not taking your goals into account

Make sure that the investments in your account and their risk levels reflect what you are trying to accomplish. If retirement is 20 years away, and you have your money sitting in cash or bonds, you may not reach your goals. Conversely, if you plan to buy a house in six months, and you have that money invested in the stock market, you might lose your money and not be able to recover the loss in time to buy a home.

  1. Basing your investment strategy on someone else’s risk tolerance

You wouldn’t buy shoes based on someone else’s shoe size, would you? So why would you copy your friend’s portfolio holdings without taking into account your own goals and risk tolerance?

  1. Making too many short-term moves with your long-term money

While buying and selling stock can be fun, it should be done with money that is not intended for your long-term goals. If you are really set on short-term buying and selling, open an account that is just for “play money” and leave the rest of your “serious money” in well diversified, long-term investments.

  1. Having too much money in one investment

If your income depends on your salary from a company, make sure your investments don’t also depend too heavily on the same company. A good rule of thumb is to have no more than 20% of your investments in any one company’s stock — and ideally closer to 10% or less.

  1. Not knowing what you’re actually invested in

You don’t need to know the exact stocks in the index or mutual fund that you have, but you should have a general idea of what is in your portfolio. If you use a financial advisor to manage assets, and you have no idea what they’re doing with your money, ask him or her to break it down for you in simple terms or, graphs and charts.

  1. Basing investment decisions on the news

You can’t predict what’s going to happen in the market based on what you read in the news. It can’t tell you that the stock market is really going to tank tomorrow, and that you should sell everything and go to cash. Research shows that having a well-diversified portfolio that you leave alone is a better strategy than trying to time the market.

  1. Not saving enough

This is crucial. If you aren’t saving enough, it is going to be really hard to get to where you need to be.

For example, say you make $60,000 a year. If you save 10%, or $500 a month, for the next 30 years, with an average 9% return, you’d have around $900,000 to work with come retirement. If you saved 15% and made the same return for the same time period, you’d end up with around $1.34 million. That’s a big difference!

So make a plan to bump up your savings. You don’t have to go from saving 5% of your income to 15% instantly. You can set up automatic increases of 1% every 6 months until you get there.

A Trump Presidency: Stay True to This Old Adage

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American voters have chosen to bring big change to the White House. But resist doing the same with your long-term investments, they will be fine.

Many investors worldwide began to sell late Tuesday (November 8th U.S. time) as Donald Trump looked set to win the presidency. Stock markets tanked from Asia to Europe, and a similarly steep drop seemed likely when U.S. markets opened.

On the contrary, stocks proved resilient Wednesday morning (November 9th U.S. time), benefiting those who sat on their hands instead of selling immediately.

Elections can mean big, fast short-term swings for stocks and other investments. And emotions tend to run high in times like this, so it’s understandable if you find it hard to stay calm and leave your portfolio alone.

But we have to remember, history has shown that volatility after surprise events always die down. There is no logic or reason to why markets go down after somebody is elected as president. Most of this is due to speculative or irrational investing.

Long-term investments are meant to be held for many years to your retirement and longer. Big swings in the interim are normal and should be expected. Volatility is the price that investors pay in exchange for the higher returns that stocks have historically provided over bonds and other investments.

So rather than changing around your portfolio, focus on your career, hobbies and family, and avoid being overwhelmed with information. This is just one of the many events that will ride out itself.

2 Investing Biases that Hurt Your Retirement Savings

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Being aware of our behavioural biases could mean a significant increase in retirement savings. There are two common biases that can affect how we save for retirement:

1. Present bias – the tendency to put more value in current or short-term decisions than the future

2. Exponential-growth bias (EGB) – the tendency to underestimate and neglect the power of compounding investment returns.

A person with present-bias may intend to save more in the future but never do so; while a person with EGB will underestimate the returns to savings and the costs of holding debt.

All is not lost, however, as understanding your own biases is the first step to creating a proper retirement savings plan to fund the lifestyle you want when you stop working.

Self-awareness has the potential to reduce the impact of our biases. For example, a person who is aware of his/her EGB could rely on the market to acquire tools or seek advice, and a present-biased person could use committed arrangements to control the impulses of his/her future self.

It is proven that people who understand their EGB, hence accurately perceived the power of compounding, had about 20% more savings than those who neglect compounding completely.

So what does this mean? Be aware and keep check of your biases, and your retirement nest egg could be a lot bigger.

A Quick Guide To Retirement Planning

Many people work their entire lives with one goal in mind – retirement. It’s one of the most important life events that is experienced by most people.

From a personal and financial perspective, achieving an easy, well-funded retirement is a lifelong process that requires early planning and commitment to a long-term goal. Once you reach retirement age, you can then enjoy the benefits of a comfortable retirement in which you have more than enough money to cover your living costs.

Managing Your Retirement

When it comes to retirement planning, the earlier you can start in your career, the better off you will be.

The problem, however, is that most young people are not thinking about retirement. After all, when you are in your 20s or 30s, being 65 or older can seem like forever.

Even for older people, it can be daunting. While everybody would like to retire in comfort and financial security, the amount of time and complexity of creating a successful retirement plan can make the whole process somewhat intimidating.

As a matter of fact, retirement planning often can be done very easily. All it takes is a little homework, an obtainable savings and investment plan, and the long-term commitment to preparing for your retirement years.

How Much Do You Need for Retirement?

After you stop working, your expenses don’t stop. In fact, given the fact that you probably will be dealing with more health issues, they are likely to be higher.

So how much money do you actually need to fully fund a comfortable retirement? While an exact answer is impossible to give, there are some factors that should be considered:

Medical Expenses – If and when you become ill, you are going to want the top-quality medical services that are available. Most people don’t want to have to depend on charity or welfare. In Singapore, everyone is entitled to MediShield Life benefits. But this publicly funded program only covers minimal expenses. And there often is a gap between what the government will pay for and what you actually need.

Living Expenses – You are still going to have to live indoors, wear clothes, eat food, and have heat and fresh air to breathe when you are retired. All of these things cost money. Even if your mortgage is paid off by the time you retire, you are still going to have to pay property taxes, homeowners insurance, and maintenance costs.

Other Expenses – A comfortable retirement includes such non-essential expenses as entertainment, transportation costs, and other expenses that don’t fall into the other categories.

Add these all up, add the rate of inflation between now and your retirement date, and you have a general idea of how much money you are going to need for your retirement. Now all you have to is multiply that number by how long you expect to live!

Start Planning Now

Retirement planning is a process that takes decades of commitment in order to achieve the end result: The comfortable retirement you deserve. The concept of saving and investing money in a retirement fund may seem daunting, but with a few basic calculations and commitment to a realistic plan, you can achieve it.