The Lifecycle Financial Planning Approach

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The lifecycle financial planning approach places all your financial activity into distinct time periods, or stages, with retirement acting as the final phase in the financial lifecycle.

This approach is powerful as it provides you a clear framework for evaluating different decisions. Here are the 5 standard financial life stages encompassed in the lifecycle approach. Keep in mind the stated age ranges are merely guideposts, some of you will pass through stages more quickly or more slowly depending on your circumstances.

1. Early Career
Ranging in age from 25 to 35 years old, early career phase adults are starting to build a foundation for a strong financial future. You may be planning to start a family, if you have not done so already. If you do not yet own a home, you might be saving for one. At this stage, keeping income in step with expenses is a struggle, but it’s important to lay the groundwork for retirement saving now.

2. Career Development
From ages 35 to 50, earnings rise, but so do financial demands. Keeping expenses in line with income is a challenge in this stage. Many families are concerned with covering college costs and paying for ongoing expenses while also increasing the pace of saving for retirement.

3. Peak Accumulation
In this stage, from the early 50s into the early 60s, you typically reach your maximum income level. It may be a time of relative freedom as your children have graduated from college. Without college tuition and with lower expenses, you can accelerate savings rates to position yourself for a more secure retirement.

4. Pre-Retirement
About 3 to 6 years before winding down professionally, you should start restructuring assets to reduce risk and increase income. By this point, mortgages are usually paid and children are independent. This is the time to evaluate retirement income options and the tax consequences of investments.

5. Retirement
The final financial lifecycle phase occurs for people in their mid-60s and beyond. Once you stop working, your focus shifts from wealth accumulation to income preservation. In this stage, the goal is to preserve your purchasing power and enjoy your desired lifestyle. Estate planning and legacy considerations also gain importance as you age.

As we transition through each life stage, we should adjust our focus each step of the way to ensure our financial plan remains appropriate for our risk tolerance, age and goals.

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4 Life Stages of Financial Planning

Many of us know that financial planning is a lifelong process. Our ultimate dream is to achieve a retirement life which we desire. This could mean being debt-free, having a passive stream of income and best of all, pursuing our interest and passion which we might not get to do in our younger days.

Our lifelong financial process can be split into 4 stages. What are the crucial aspects which we should consider at each stage? Read on to find out more.

Stage 1: Young Adult (Aged 20-30)

The young adult is new to the working world and naturally earns a low income. He/she is driven to succeed and increase his earning ability. Being single, there are little or no financial commitments for him/her. Some may have an education loan to pay off after graduation which can be fully redeemed after working for 2 to 3 years.

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This is the best time for you to start some form of wealth accumulation to prepare for retirement as it could be harder to save money in later stages of life when financial commitments increase. With the high risk tolerance at a young age, investing in more equities and mutual funds on a regular basis is recommended.

 

Buying a house is common goal for young couples preparing to get married. Do the math on your liquid finances and CPF savings to find out which type of property best suits your financial ability.

Having a comprehensive insurance portfolio is a must as well for wealth protection. Key insurance components include Hospital & Surgical, Critical Illness and Disability.

Stage 2: Young Family (Aged 30-40)

At this stage, one could be married with or without children. With a moderate income, you would have more financial commitments such as a home loan and a car loan. Retirement planning remains an essential component in your portfolio. Risk tolerance starts to moderate as you are one step closer to retirement. A correct investment mix of equity and fixed income helps you to achieve financial goals easily.

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Being a parent, getting insurance cover for your child prevents you from incurring unnecessary huge medical bills. Saving for your child’s future tertiary education should be your concern too. Another wealth protection area concerns the largest debt that you share with your spouse – home loan. If a spouse passes away, any outstanding loan is left to be paid off by the surviving spouse. Be responsible in financially protecting your loved ones in the event of your passing.

 

Stage 3: Mature Family (Aged 40-50)

Your children are grown up by this stage of your life. Your earning ability is at its highest and naturally your expenses increase as well. You could possibly take up a bigger car loan of home loan, thus increasing your financial commitment.

Child’s education and retirement planning are your main financial objectives for the long term. Therefore, your investments should be diversified in equities and debts instruments according to your age, available time and risk ability.

Stage 4: Pre-retirees or Retirees (Aged 50 and above)

retireesBy now, your home loan would have been fully paid off and your children are no longer dependent on you financially. This means low financial commitment which means your protection needs are its lowest stage. However, health insurance continues to play an important role as you age.

The security of your retirement savings carefully accumulated over your younger days, coupled with regular income, becomes your focus now. For that, investments should be more in fixed income which yields regular income with low risk.