The 7 Deadly Sins of Investing

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There are a few investing errors that many people make — mistakes that are detrimental to their overall investment strategies. Here are the Deadly Sins of Investing that you should avoid…

  1. Not taking your goals into account

Make sure that the investments in your account and their risk levels reflect what you are trying to accomplish. If retirement is 20 years away, and you have your money sitting in cash or bonds, you may not reach your goals. Conversely, if you plan to buy a house in six months, and you have that money invested in the stock market, you might lose your money and not be able to recover the loss in time to buy a home.

  1. Basing your investment strategy on someone else’s risk tolerance

You wouldn’t buy shoes based on someone else’s shoe size, would you? So why would you copy your friend’s portfolio holdings without taking into account your own goals and risk tolerance?

  1. Making too many short-term moves with your long-term money

While buying and selling stock can be fun, it should be done with money that is not intended for your long-term goals. If you are really set on short-term buying and selling, open an account that is just for “play money” and leave the rest of your “serious money” in well diversified, long-term investments.

  1. Having too much money in one investment

If your income depends on your salary from a company, make sure your investments don’t also depend too heavily on the same company. A good rule of thumb is to have no more than 20% of your investments in any one company’s stock — and ideally closer to 10% or less.

  1. Not knowing what you’re actually invested in

You don’t need to know the exact stocks in the index or mutual fund that you have, but you should have a general idea of what is in your portfolio. If you use a financial advisor to manage assets, and you have no idea what they’re doing with your money, ask him or her to break it down for you in simple terms or, graphs and charts.

  1. Basing investment decisions on the news

You can’t predict what’s going to happen in the market based on what you read in the news. It can’t tell you that the stock market is really going to tank tomorrow, and that you should sell everything and go to cash. Research shows that having a well-diversified portfolio that you leave alone is a better strategy than trying to time the market.

  1. Not saving enough

This is crucial. If you aren’t saving enough, it is going to be really hard to get to where you need to be.

For example, say you make $60,000 a year. If you save 10%, or $500 a month, for the next 30 years, with an average 9% return, you’d have around $900,000 to work with come retirement. If you saved 15% and made the same return for the same time period, you’d end up with around $1.34 million. That’s a big difference!

So make a plan to bump up your savings. You don’t have to go from saving 5% of your income to 15% instantly. You can set up automatic increases of 1% every 6 months until you get there.

4 Life Stages of Financial Planning

Many of us know that financial planning is a lifelong process. Our ultimate dream is to achieve a retirement life which we desire. This could mean being debt-free, having a passive stream of income and best of all, pursuing our interest and passion which we might not get to do in our younger days.

Our lifelong financial process can be split into 4 stages. What are the crucial aspects which we should consider at each stage? Read on to find out more.

Stage 1: Young Adult (Aged 20-30)

The young adult is new to the working world and naturally earns a low income. He/she is driven to succeed and increase his earning ability. Being single, there are little or no financial commitments for him/her. Some may have an education loan to pay off after graduation which can be fully redeemed after working for 2 to 3 years.

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This is the best time for you to start some form of wealth accumulation to prepare for retirement as it could be harder to save money in later stages of life when financial commitments increase. With the high risk tolerance at a young age, investing in more equities and mutual funds on a regular basis is recommended.

 

Buying a house is common goal for young couples preparing to get married. Do the math on your liquid finances and CPF savings to find out which type of property best suits your financial ability.

Having a comprehensive insurance portfolio is a must as well for wealth protection. Key insurance components include Hospital & Surgical, Critical Illness and Disability.

Stage 2: Young Family (Aged 30-40)

At this stage, one could be married with or without children. With a moderate income, you would have more financial commitments such as a home loan and a car loan. Retirement planning remains an essential component in your portfolio. Risk tolerance starts to moderate as you are one step closer to retirement. A correct investment mix of equity and fixed income helps you to achieve financial goals easily.

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Being a parent, getting insurance cover for your child prevents you from incurring unnecessary huge medical bills. Saving for your child’s future tertiary education should be your concern too. Another wealth protection area concerns the largest debt that you share with your spouse – home loan. If a spouse passes away, any outstanding loan is left to be paid off by the surviving spouse. Be responsible in financially protecting your loved ones in the event of your passing.

 

Stage 3: Mature Family (Aged 40-50)

Your children are grown up by this stage of your life. Your earning ability is at its highest and naturally your expenses increase as well. You could possibly take up a bigger car loan of home loan, thus increasing your financial commitment.

Child’s education and retirement planning are your main financial objectives for the long term. Therefore, your investments should be diversified in equities and debts instruments according to your age, available time and risk ability.

Stage 4: Pre-retirees or Retirees (Aged 50 and above)

retireesBy now, your home loan would have been fully paid off and your children are no longer dependent on you financially. This means low financial commitment which means your protection needs are its lowest stage. However, health insurance continues to play an important role as you age.

The security of your retirement savings carefully accumulated over your younger days, coupled with regular income, becomes your focus now. For that, investments should be more in fixed income which yields regular income with low risk.