4 Financial Essentials for New Parents

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Being part of the Gen Y babies born in the 1980s, in recent years I have found myself often discussing the topic of parenting with my friends who have just become Mums and Dads. Interestingly, quite a handful of them have asked me the same questions: How can I financially plan for my baby? What are policies should I be looking at as a parent now? This article shall touch on these concerns for new parents.

1. Get Health Insurance

According to statistics from the Ministry of Health, the average probability across both genders of a child aged 0-4 being warded is higher than that of the population aged 5-69. It is therefore, never too early to have our newborn well-covered for hospital bills. At the same time, it is equally important for parents, who are the ones bringing the dough home, to have adequate health insurance for themselves.

2. Get Life Insurance

Each parent should also take out a life insurance plan to offer financial stability. Many parents get a life insurance plan on a child as soon as they bring him or her home, but it’s more likely that something will happen to one of the parents. Life insurance will cover the cost of child care if the surviving parent has to work, as well as other expenses related to bringing up the child. The purpose of life insurance is to make sure the surviving spouse can continue to take care of the kids.

3. Create an Education Savings Plan, Don’t Overlook Retirement

A child might not have taken his first steps, but soon he’ll be walking across the graduation stage, so time is of the essence when it comes to saving for tertiary education. However, it is important to balance the need to pay for your child’s education and save for your retirement.

Most new parents are very excited and focused on making sure their kids have great early years that they overlook planning for their own retirement – which is equally, if not more important. There are many financing options to send a kid to university, like taking out loans and scholarships, but there are no loans for retirement.

Because of this, parents need to consider their retirement savings first before putting money aside for their child’s education. It is important to discuss with your spouse how much you want to contribute to your child’s education and weigh that with what they can save for retirement.

4. Plan for the Unexpected

Once the baby is home with the sleeping and eating routine established, parents need to determine and detail an estate plan in case something happens to one or both of them. Parents need to create a will stating who would care for the child in case the unimaginable happens.

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Are You Prepared for Your Child’s Education?

education moneyAt the rate education costs are escalating, tertiary fees can become exorbitant by the time our children are ready. It is no wonder less than half of Singaporean parents are financially prepared for their children’s education based on a survey conducted by OCBC Bank in December 2013.

Tuition fees for local universities are estimated to inflate at 3.5 percent per annum, whereas the increase in fees at overseas universities such as the US, UK and Australia, can range from 4.8 to 5.9 percent. If we include living expenses and airfare (for overseas universities) which will also inflate at estimated 3 and 5.3 percent per annum respectively, the total amount can become a huge financial strain if proper planning is not done.

Annual tuition fees for NUS, according to their website, are $9,000 for the average course of study.

Assuming an average course is 3 years = $27,000 total fees.
Assuming education inflation of 3.5% for 20 years = about $50,000.

Hence, when it comes to planning for our children’s education, start early with an education plan. It is essentially an endowment policy, in which we receive a lump sum at maturity. Some of these policies pay out a sum of money once every few years. This will ease our worry of not having sufficient funds to pay for our kids’ education in the future.